I’ll have what she’s having—minus the internalized ageism.

“There is also something profoundly liberating about aging,” Dominique Browning wrote in the New York Times. “Only when you hit 60 can you begin to say, with great aplomb: ‘I’m too old for this.’” That’s her new mantra, and the title of her essay, which lingered on the Times’s most-emailed list for days. Why? Because people want stories that ring true to their experience of growing older because they include its welcome aspects.

 

What’s wrong with the New York Times’ digital brand? The “grandpa in a nightclub” problem, apparently.

This week Harvard’s Nieman Journalism Lab ran a piece about the New York Times’ digital branding efforts. It quoted a series of tweets by Max Pfennighaus, who is the executive creative director of brand and marketing at the Times and previously held the same position at NPR, and whose job is to build the newspaper’s digital brand. He described the core challenge as the “grandpa in a nightclub” problem.

An open invitation to Caitlyn Jenner

This post is by Sheila Roher, MPH, a veteran of the feminist and LGBT movements, who advocates a social movement approach to transform our social imagination around longevity. After studying with Dr. Robert Butler at Columbia University, she worked with “Age Friendly NYC” at the New York Academy of Medicine. She is the founder of Radical Age Lab, a social enterprise business, and is working on a book about aging in the 21st century.

 

“I am a woman,” George told me. “I’ve always felt like a woman.”  

Having the Talk—not the one about sex, the one about dying

A close friend’s grandfather is dying, though no one knows how close to death he is—perhaps months away. Even his doctor seems clueless, although perhaps he’s just not saying. In any case, he’s not asking. And even if everything were in the open and everyone on the same page—a pipe dream, I realize—no playbook would reveal itself. Dying is a concatenation of unpredictable events.

 

Declaring independence from ageism

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The Changing Aging blog declared Independence from Ageism on the Fourth of July and named four "incredible leaders to wage this war: Dr. Bill Thomas; the late Dr. Robert Butler, who coined the term ageism; Ronni Bennett, elder-blogger extraordinaire; and Ashton Applewhite, the Imperator Furiosa of anti-ageism." Played by Charlize Theron, Furiosa is the main protagonist of this summer's Mad Max: Fury Road movie, and she is seriously badass. Make my day, and what great company to be keeping. Saddle up!

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