I'm one of "100 Inspiring Women" making positive change around the world

 The inaugural issue of Salt magazine lists me as one of their “100 greatest change agents—women who have a hugely positive influence all over the world."  I'm one of very few Americans and keep company with remarkable social justice and human rights activists, including Aung Sang Suu Kyi, Arundhati Roy, Pussy Riot, Germaine Greer, Jane Goodall, and Naomi Wolf.  It's very exciting to see ageism on the world stage and have my work recognized in this way.

Finally—a snappy answer when someone calls you "young lady"

It's great to see Peg Cruikshank blogging for the Silver Century Foundation alongside Margaret Gullette and me. Cruikshank is the author of Learning to Be Old, among other important books, and her first post tackles what she calls the "Young Lady Dance." What's her response to being addressed as "young lady?"

"Why are you calling attention to my age?"

So Gay and So Old

 This guest post is by Sheila Roher, MPH, a veteran of the feminist and LGBT movements, who advocates a social movement approach to transform our social imagination around longevity. After studying with Dr. Robert Butler at Columbia University, she worked with “Age Friendly NYC”  at the New York Academy of Medicine where she focused on employment and educational opportunities for older adults.

Want older people to be healthy? End ageism.

There’s a lot of disagreement around how to frame the last century’s unprecedented increase in human lifespan. Is it a crisis or an opportunity? Will a “grey tsunami” of incapacitated freeloaders sweep us off our feet, or will we tap into the social capital of millions more healthy, well-educated adults?  Are longer lives a blessing or a curse? Experience and ideology shape the responses, of course, but there’s one thing both liberals and libertarians can agree on. What single characteristic of these older Americans will make the most difference? Their health. Living longer looks a lot more attractive when it’s uncoupled from cognitive and physical decline. It’s a lot cheaper too: illness is expensive.

Yoko Ono tackles ageist critics. And dances badly.

On her 82nd birthday, visionary artist and activist Yoko Ono released a music video called “Bad Dancer,” named after the first single on her latest Band album. Critics didn’t mind the dancing—they were warned, after all—but made plenty of disparaging comments about her singing and her costume. Ono struck back with an open letter about ageism in the music industry.  

 

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