attitude

Want older people to be healthy? End ageism.

There’s a lot of disagreement around how to frame the last century’s unprecedented increase in human lifespan. Is it a crisis or an opportunity? Will a “grey tsunami” of incapacitated freeloaders sweep us off our feet, or will we tap into the social capital of millions more healthy, well-educated adults?  Are longer lives a blessing or a curse? Experience and ideology shape the responses, of course, but there’s one thing both liberals and libertarians can agree on. What single characteristic of these older Americans will make the most difference? Their health. Living longer looks a lot more attractive when it’s uncoupled from cognitive and physical decline. It’s a lot cheaper too: illness is expensive.

“. . . as fun as we 60+ers could manage?”

That offending phrase, and offend it did, appeared in a group email, the group being a bunch of college classmates who pass around photos of get-togethers and nostalgia-based music recommendations. The context was a boating foray in which food, fun, and alcohol were dispensed, the latter “not like gin and juice at DKE but as fun as we 60+ers could manage.”

Guest Post: Ageism Hides in Plain Sight

This is a guest post from Kathy Sporre, who can be found at refinedbyage.com. This guest post was originally published in the Journal of Active Aging. Thank you Kathy!

 


In a society that still accepts ageism, denial takes many forms. It’s time to challenge this damaging bias against older adults and signal ‘the beginning of the end’ for ageist practices.

 

finding beauty, silencing complaints — two stories

About 35 members of the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) heard my talk last week as the last of a week of free workshops. RSVP “connects individuals who are 55+ to meaningful volunteer opportunities throughout New York City.” Since people who do meaningful work on a regular basis aren’t retired, RSVP is a lousy name, as director Meredith Gemeiner readily admits. But it’s a good program, the volunteers liked what I had to say, and two of them told great stories during the follow-up conversation.  

 

The Ageing Party!

That's the title of an invitation from my friend Masha Feiguinova that landed in my in-box a little while ago. It reads, "I am ageing! On April 29th I will celebrate 34 years of ageing. I would LOVE to see you, celebrate with you, hug you and toast with you. More details soon. For now please hold the evening of April xxth open. If you are partial to ageing, come to the ageing party!"

 

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