Zeitgeist

Out there, way out there

Behold, a Revolution is Afoot

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That's the title of a galvanizing post on Midcentury Modern, a site where "The formerly young get their say in this this smart conversation about age, identity and generational politics in America." I'm delighted to be part of it, and even more so to see comrades growing in number all the time. The phrase spraypainted on that wall is attributed to Maggie Kuhn, founder of the Gray Panthers.

 

Anne Lamott about my book: "Wow."

The epigraph to my book, which willl be published on March 15th, is a quote from the wonderful writer Anne Lamott: "We contain all the ages we have ever been." It's an elegant counterpoint to the conventional narrative of aging as loss—aging as a rich process of accretion—and it also connects the generations. The quote inspired the cover drawing by brilliant designer Rebeca Mendez,

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blurb from eminent historian Stephanie Coontz

Twenty years ago I screwed up my courage and sent a copy of my book, Cutting Loose: Why Women Who End Their Marriages Do So Well, to the author and historian Stephanie Coontz, one of my culture heroes. Six months later the phone rang.  It was Stephanie, asking if I'd like to join the nascent Council on Contemporary Familes, now the go-to resource for reliable research about American families as they really are. Here's what she had to say about This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism:

End-of-year break

I'm going on vacation - and if that's not enough of an excuse, I broke my wrist and can't type - so no barricade-storming for two weeks or so. It's been a terrific year - thanks for all the support - and 2016 is looking great. My book, This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism, will be out in the spring.

 

Introducing the eighth video on my YouTube channel

Clip #8: There’s no such thing as “age-appropriate.”

Where does the message that we’re “too old” for something—be it a task, a relationship, or a haircut—originate? Usually between our ears, because we’ve internalized a lifetime of messages that older people are undesirable or incompetent or unwelcome, and should shuffle to the sidelines. Preferably without making a fuss.  

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